Monthly Archives: May 2020

A Comparative Method…

*

…The Tetrahedron is the magical symbol for elemental fire.

Fire has always carried with it a mystery.
From earliest times it was thought the proper preserve of the Divine.
For man to have gained this dangerous boon took especial cunning, courage and skill.
The fire-bringer in the old stories was a demi-god, a hero, a trickster…

In Vedic Mythology, which arose from the Indus Valley Civilisation, the fire sacrifice is regarded as a mental operation, an operation of the mind or of consciousness.
It has the aim of transcending the three worlds beneath the sun which are subject to the endless round of birth and death… and of reaching the realm beyond the sun where dwell the immortals.
Its practitioners are Agni (‘fire’) Vayu (‘spirit’) and Aditya (‘sun’).

Contemporary descriptions of Agni vary; some give him seven hands and tongues but only two heads, others depict him with three heads and as many golden bodies.

Untitled
Whatever Agni actually looks like, if he can actually be seen, you would not perhaps expect to meet his like in the classical world.
And yet there is one figure whose ‘story’ bears comparison with that of Agni.
Hermes!

Seven Flaming Tongues

1
– Original research by A.M. Hocart.

Over time Hermes became patron of the western mystery tradition and so we may surmise that for the Vedic culture too Agni was a patron of an esoteric science.
The word is cognate in our culture with ignite, ignition and igneous though not with iguana.

What kind of Fire traverses Three-Worlds and leads to a realm beyond the Sun?

*

Amnesiac…

*

Spontaneous Internal Combustion.

You may have heard of the phenomenon?

It can now be regarded as the final death-knell for the Theory of Evolution by Natural Selection.

It is hardly likely that any ‘new species’ would simultaneously errupt on the face of the planet like so many hot flushes.

Yet, once a memory is framed, and accepted, it can be true at all times and all places without ‘compunction’.

It also means, that we are born into a past that never happened,

and pass-on into a future that is real.

 

Old Priest’s Parlour…

*

Where silver trees have bent their bough

O’er sleepy village streets, we go

to solve the riddle of the stones

A scattered presence in a row.

*

To nourish soul and body’s need-

A place where ancient bards ovate,

A haunted landscape sows the seed

For seeker and initiate.

*

A stone that moves, a mount aligned,

And after Glaston’s tower named…

And Bronte’s heroine maligned

Associate of pastor’s fame…

*

Thor’s Cave…

*

Had there been any doubt about where we were going next…

Which there wasn’t.

*

*

For once, our destination proved quite easy to get to.

A car park was suggested by the guidebook and in the car park were easy to follow directions.

*

*

Not too far away to be too uncomfortable.

But just far enough away to deter commercialisation.

*

*

These are all metaphors.

And the metaphors continued at the mouth of the cave.

*

*

Whose approach to the interior provided an effective deterrent against the casual tourist.

But not to us because we are not.

*

*

The thing about caves…

You never want them to end…

*

*

But they always do.

*

*

Which is why we deal in metaphysics.

The way beyond the end of the earth is Geometry.

*

*

Which does not so much measure the earth.

*

*

As inform it…

*

 

Of Truth and Legend…

*

‘The Silver Well: Legend says that St Augustine once visited Dorset. While there he met some shepherds grazing their flocks and asked them whether they would prefer beer or water to drink. The temperate shepherds replied ‘water’ whereupon St. Augustine struck the ground with his staff, crying, ‘Cerno El’ as the water gushed out. The words were supposedly a pun on Cernel, the old name of the village and meant ‘I perceive God.’

It is thought that the above legend was invented by the Benedictine monks of Cerne Abbey to serve as an attraction to pilgrims.
Closer to the truth perhaps is the story of St. Edwold, a member of the Mercian Royal Family who one day had a vision of a silver well. He went wandering through the countryside and when he came to Cerne he gave some silver pennies to a shepherd in return for bread and water. The shepherd then showed him a well where he could drink and St Edwold recognised it as the well of his vision. He built a small hermitage by the spring and lived there until his death in 871…’

Information Plaque, Cerne Abbas

*

‘Are the monks responsible for the Legend of Silver Well such villains if they tweak the truth in order to entice pilgrims to their shrine?

People who have embarked on a Pilgrimage always get something, even if that something isn not quite what they bargained for.

And how true is the earlier story of St Edwold for that matter?

There was doubtless a hermit and a hermitage at one time.

How he actually came to be there is quite another thing altogether.’

Excerpt from, The Heart of Albion by Stuart France and Sue Vincent