Tag Archives: mythology

Skunk seeks medicine: Fear…

*

… “There is nothing I fear!” sang Skunk going his way, “there is just nothing I fear! Should a boulder roll at me as I pass I would squirt it with musk and blast it into a thousand pieces, there is nothing I fear! Should a pine tree fall over me I would squirt it with musk and split it into a thousand splinters, there is nothing I fear!”

Just then Skunk stopped in his tracks for a thought had come to him.

A long buried memory of the one thing that he did fear.

“Just one thing I fear,” went the song before Skunk could stop it, and that made Skunk even more nervous. He started running to and fro from one side of the valley to the other, “Only one thing I fear,” went the song as Skunk wheedled his way up the valley.

 Rice-Bird, who had been feigning death in Skunk’s back pack the whole time could hear all his prattling.

“Oh, I do wish Skunk would name his fear,” thought Rice-Bird.

“There is one thing I fear so I will have to name it,” went on Skunk.

“Oh good,” thought Rice-Bird.

“The thing I fear is whistling, the thing I fear is whistling!”

With his fear out in the open of the wide valley, Skunk became even more frightened and he bolted at top speed up the valley…

to be continued

The Eye-Guy’s Eye…

Human Eye

*

…”I don’t get it.”

“In Geometry, before one can draw a human eye, one has to draw a cat’s eye.”

“I still don’t get it.”

“It’s a process.”

“And in any process things have to happen in a certain order…”

“You said that without using your brain.”

“…First one thing, and then another.”

“And that.”

“But what thing and what other?”

“Ah ha! In this case, Night and Day.”

“Cat’s-Eye and Human Eye!”

“There’s more to it than that though.”

“In what sense more?”

“In a magical sense.”

“Old magic?”

“Well, it would have to be, very old magic.”

“Whoo-Hoo!”

*

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The Real Eye-Guy…

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*

…It happened that one day Pryderi’s doorkeeper, Conan Duffy,

was sunning himself at the portal, along with his cat,

and he saw two beautiful youths

heading towards him over the game plain…

…When they reached the enrtrance to the Dun

the two youths saluted him, and he saluted them back.

*

“And who might you be?” Said Conan looking the

 two of them up and down, “and what is your business?”

 “Why, I might be Maech,” said one of them.

“And I might be Amech,” said the other, and she smiled…

Just then a loud groan issued from the fair mound, it was

Pryderi, Lord of Underhill, at pains with his arm again.

“…And we are both physicians,” said Maech and he smiled too.

*

“Well, if you are both physicians,” said Conan, “you’ll have

no problem putting a new eye where my old one used to be,

now will you?”

And he veered up close to show them his scar.

 Amech looked at the cat sunning itself by Conan’s side and said,

“we could put one of the eyes from that there cat, where your old eye used to be.”

“You could?” asked Conan.

“We could,” said Maech and with that the two of them swiftly

seized the cat, which is no easy thing if a cat does not want to

be siezed, and they did what had to be done, until one of the cat’s

eyes sat, as pretty as you please, in the head of Conan Duffy.

Conan blinked increduously and ran off into the fair mound…

*

“The Eye-Guy?”

“Oh yes…”

“And the Geometry?”

“For the Geometry, you’ll just have to wait.”

*

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The Eye-Guy…

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*

SPOILS OF THE ABYSS

 When Pryderi, Lord of Underhill, was treated for the

 injury done to his arm by Tyrnonos, Thunder-of-Water,

 his leech, Nudd, found that he was unable to save the limb; so

 he hacked it down to a stump and put a silver hand on Pryderi which

 was so cunningly crafted that it had all the movement of a natural hand.

*

Yet still Pryderi had no end of pain and trouble with the arm

and he was forever lying sick in his bed from the grief of it…

*

“Not a particularly auspicious start, and no sign of our ‘Eye-Guy’.”

“Give it time.” …

“Did they have ‘bionic’ hands in those days then?”

“A ha… I don’t know, did they have ‘bionic’ hands in those days?”

“I think not.”

“We are dealing with the Crafty Folk here, remember?”

“I still think not.”

“So, to what can the silver hand or arm refer?”

“It would be useful to know which we are dealing with, actually.”

“Some sources specify hand, some specify arm, and this lack of precision may itself be the clue to our non literal interpretation. You’d think they’d know!”

“You would.”

“Let’s settle on limb, then. To what can the silver-limb refer?”

“If it’s silver it could have something to do with the moon?”

“I think that’s a very auspicious start.”

“Or a tree?”

“Even better, what sort of tree?”

“A birch tree.”

“Now, I know that is an incredibly auspicious start.”

*

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Star-Boy…

*

In the beginning…

Star-Boy went about the world

Defending people against their enemies.

*

Star-Boy was so strong…

He broke all bows of wood

And armed himself with a bone-bow

A bone-knife

And a stone war-club.

*

One day…

Star-Boy came to a village of frogs

The Frog-Men poured out of their lodge to greet him.

They set before him food but no water.

“Whoever goes to the water, never returns,” said the Head Frog-Man.

“A great warrior lives there.”

“He has swallowed many of us alive.”

“So now, we thirst.”

*

Star-Boy, himself was thirsty after his meal.

He went down to the waterside and was swallowed by a Big Fish.

With his bone-knife he slashed at the gills of the Big Fish and cut his way  out.

He went back to the Frog-Men and slung the fish carcase at their feet.

“You need thirst no more,” he said.

*

 

…and Red-Fox.

*

…In another part of the meadow Red-Fox was hunting mice for breakfast. He saw one and jumped on him with with all four feet but the little fellow got away.

In his disappointment Red-Fox heard a distant call, “Bring a knife!”

He started in the direction of the call and as it got louder he continued.

By and by he came across the body of Buffalo lying on the ground with Field-Mouse still standing atop it.

“If you dress this Buffalo for me I shall give you some of the meat,” said Field-Mouse.

“Very well,” said Red-Fox, and he dressed the Buffalo while Field-Mouse sat on a mound nearby looking on and giving orders.

“You must cut the meat into small pieces.”

When Red-Fox had finished his work Field-Mouse paid him with a small piece of liver. He swallowed it quickly and smacked his lips, “May I have another piece?” he asked.

“Why, I gave you the largest piece,” said Field-Mouse, “How greedy you are. You may have some of the blood clots.”

So poor Red-Fox took the blood clots and licked the grass. He really was very hungry, “I have six little ones to feed at home, may I take some more meat?”

“You can take the four feet of Buffalo,” said Field-Mouse, “that ought to be enough for your little ones.”

“And what of my wife,” said Red-Fox.

“Why, she can have the head,” said Field-Mouse.

Thereupon Red-Fox jumped on Field-Mouse who just had time to let out a faint squeak before he disappeared.

*

…Buffalo…

*

…Buffalo trampled the grass and tore up the earth with his front hoofs but when he looked for Field-Mouse he was nowhere to be found.

‘That’s put an end to him,’ thought Buffalo.

Just then he felt a scratching in his right ear, so he shook his head as hard as he could and twitched his ears to and fro.

But the scratching in his ear became a gnawing which went deeper and deeper until he was mad with pain.

Buffalo pawed with his hoofs and tore up the sod with his horns. Bellowing, loudly, he ran as fast as he could in circles but at last he stopped and stood still, trembling.

Out from his ear jumped Field-Mouse and said, “Will you now admit that I am master?”

“Never!” bellowed Buffalo and again charged at Field-Mouse in an attempt to trample him under-hoof.

But the little fellow again disappeared and moments later Buffalo felt a scratching in his left ear. Once again he was driven mad with pain and he ran about the meadow in a frenzy, sometimes leaping high in the air. At last he fell to the ground and lay stock still.

Field-Mouse crept out of his ear and stood proudly on his dead body.

“Hi-Ho,” he said I have killed the greatest of beasts, “this will prove to all my master-ship.”

Field-Mouse began to call lout loudly for a knife to dress his game…

*